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Japanese Meal Manner ” Itadakimasu ”and” Gochisosama ”

 2016/02/18 Japanese Food   55 Views

contents

1.Japanese Meal Manner itadakimasu

2.Japanese Meal Manner gochisosama

3.Japanese Meal Manner Home deciplin in Japan

4.Another Etiquette while eating in Japan
  1. Summary
Before eating meals, Japanese people join their hands in front of their chest and greet by saying, “I-ta-da-ki-ma-su.” After finishing a meal, the body form is the same, but the greeting is “Go-chi-so-sa-ma.”  What do these words mean?



 
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Japanese Meal Manner ”itadakimasu”

“Itadaku” is a word to indicate modesty for taking and eating. Its origin comes from the Japanese Kanji character, “頂,” which means “top of the head” and refers to the body position (kneeling down, head bowed, arms extended upward) when receiving something from a higher-ranking person. “Itadaku is also thought of as, ‘Thank you very much for giving up your life in order for me to live my life. The word “Itadakimasu” also shows thanks to the person(s) who have prepared a meal to be eaten as part of day-to-day manners.

Japanese Meal Manner ”gochisousama”

Gochisosama is written in the Japanese Kanji characters as, 御馳走様. ‘Chiso’ implies the act of running. It comes from times before the invention of the refrigerator when people had to obtain ingredients from many places in order to prepare a meal. The ‘go’ part adds formality to the word and is used for more respect. “Gochiso” means a feastful and luxurious meal. “Sama” is a respectful suffix that’s added after person’s name. Adding “sama” shows respect and thanks to the person(s) who prepared the meal. All parts together forming the word “Gochisosama.”

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Home discipline in Japan

I explained why Japanese people say Itadakimasu before they eat. When finish eating, people say, Gochisosamaor Gochisosama. . As well as Itadakimasu, Japanese people are strictly taught to say, Gochisosama after eating since they are small.  From childhood, Japnaese people are naturallly trained  to accept saying Itadakimasu and Gochisosama.  There are same kinds of words such as Ittekimasu, which means I’m leaving home, and Tadaima, which means I’m coming back home.

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Another Etiquette while eating in Japan

Children are especially encouraged to eat every last grain of rice –mottainai- as Buddhist philosophy. It is impolite to pick out certain ingredients and leave the rest. One should chew with the mouth closed.

It is acceptable to lift soup and rice bowls to the mouth so that one does not spill food. Miso soup is drunk directly from the bowl, rather than with a spoon. It is also appropriate to slurp certain foods, especially ramen or soba noodles.Western-style noodles should not be slurped.

There are many traditions and unwritten rules surrounding the use of chopsticks. For example, it is considered particularly taboo to pass food from chopsticks to chopsticks, as this is how bones are handled by the family of the deceased after a cremation.

Summary

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Before eating meals, Japanese people join their hands in front of their chest and greet by saying, “I-ta-da-ki-ma-su.” After finishing a meal, the body form is the same, but the greeting is “Go-chi-so-sa-ma.”

“Itadaku” is a word to indicate modesty for taking and eating. Its origin comes from the Japanese Kanji character.

Gochisosama is written in the Japanese Kanji characters as, 御馳走様. ‘Chiso’ implies the act of running.

As well as Itadakimasu, Japanese people are strictly taught to say, Gochisosama after eating since they are small. Children are especially encouraged to eat every last grain of rice –mottainai- as Buddhist philosophy. It is impolite to pick out certain ingredients and leave the rest. One should chew with the mouth closed.

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